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Marysville House

project features

  • Replacement of a holiday house destroyed on Black Saturday
  • Simple design the focused on the essential needs for a holiday house
  • Compact timber box
  • Passive solar design
  • Optimised cross ventilation
  • High energy rating
  • View from below
    View from below
  • House, deck and outdoor bathtub
    House, deck and outdoor bathtub
  • House, deck and posts for pergola
    House, deck and posts for pergola
  • Floor plan
    Floor plan
  • Section
    Section
  • View from inside
    View from inside
  • Dining area
    Dining area
  • Bookshelf and access to mezzanine
    Bookshelf and access to mezzanine
  • Openable windows allow cross ventilation
    Openable windows allow cross ventilation
  • Main entrance at dusk
    Main entrance at dusk
  • North elevation at dusk
    North elevation at dusk
  • North elevation at night
    North elevation at night

The Marysville House replaces a three-bedroom holiday house, which was destroyed in the devastating Black Saturday Fires of 2009.  The house aimed to meet the recreation needs of a family of four. For us it was an exercise in restraint. 

In our first designs we envisaged a large, double storey residence with a spacious communal dining/living space, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and a detached studio. After a long and intensive planning process it became clear that a larger and complex dwelling may not be appropriate for the purpose of providing short to medium term holiday accommodation.

We pared back the design to an enlarged studio. The abode now consists of one communal room, utilities and a mezzanine, which is a sleeping platform. The design is influenced by the idea of a lodge that you might find in a remote or mountainous area. The compact nature of the building will reduce wastage and labour during construction and improve thermal performance during its lifetime. It appears effortless in context and connects with its environment with simplicity and ease.

media

Featured in Living in the Landscape, Anna Johnson and Richard Black, Thames and Hudson, 2016.
Resilient rebuild, Sanctuary magazine, 2012